Monday, May 31, 2010

found: bad postcards via this site



found: Lise Sarfati

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Friday, May 28, 2010

found: two unknown, and Lucien Coutaud

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Thursday, May 27, 2010

found: Jason Meadows, Friedl vom Gröller, Cara Phillips

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found: Baron Munchausen

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Tuesday, May 25, 2010

found: Michaela Eichwald, Hillebrand van Kampen, unknown

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Wednesday, May 19, 2010


found essay: 'The Codex Seraphinianus' by Justin Taylor

(images from Luigi Serafini's book 'Codex Seraphinianus'; source)

excerpts:

"I saw a flattish doughnut, possibly made of liquid, and colored a soft, rich red. While the doughnut’s inner ring (i.e., the perimeter of the doughnut’s hole) was perfectly round, the outer ring was irregularly shaped, and appeared more like an elastic membrane. Ladybugs, the same color as the doughnut but also stippled with their standard black dots, emerged from the outer ring and crawled off in all directions. On closer inspection, it didn’t appear that the ladybugs had pushed through the membranous outer ring; no, it seemed more like they were forming from the doughnut material. Parts of the doughnut’s outer ring appeared scooped out, and these inlets seemed to correspond to the various fully formed ladybugs that had walked away."

“It would become a drastically different book the minute it became completely translated,” Jackson said, “which of course could be part of the plan. He could have conceived this as a sort of embryonic or chrysalitic work that at some point would take a kind of completely different shape. But the way I see it, it’s probably meant to hover on the verge of scrutability, to constantly hold forth the possibility of being read but stay resistant at the same time. It’s important that it bothers you with the feeling that there is some content that you ought to be able to extract from it in a normal discursive kind of way. It’s meant to appeal to the rational or exegetical urge. It wants to be interpreted but it won’t let you, and it’s very interesting the way it teasingly asks to be read and then refuses. You could see this as a really really elaborate inkblot. It’s never going to completely yield to you in the sense of giving you insight into the artist’s intentions, so it kind of reverts you back on yourself and makes you notice what you’re noticing and notice the associations that you make. It’s a kind of springboard for your own creative musings.”







found: Georgia Elrod, unknown, Bette Burgoyne

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Monday, May 17, 2010

found: 'Strange Geographies'

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found essay: 'Trisha Donnelly’s Negation of Identity' by Bret Schneider

excerpts:

"Her exhibits are suggestive, and the bare minimum material necessary to implant the bare minimum of an imaginary association necessary seems an accurate description."

"the artist was able to enhance the viewers sensory and psychological experience of the gallery (one perhaps needs to ask the gallerist what they are missing, as Donnelly often embeds concepts in the institutional envelope of the works on view) with just a few materials."

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"Reference is implied, but far from secured."

"Another instance was actually the title of a drawing; the drawing’s exhibition tag said to ask the gallery for the title, upon which the viewer was given a soundfile of a drumroll."

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"Inter-media associations are regular occurrences, but never move beyond a semblance of association. It is almost association for association’s sake. Wonder at the ability to get lost in the rich world of unexplained materials, images, and ideas without having the socially driven burden of identifying what they are. This is why critics have expressed — pace serial conceptual art — that Donnelly follows a logic all her own. However, the reflective expectation for explaining on part of the viewer is what keeps the association together. Perhaps never before has the connection between objects been so dramatically implied while simultaneously being empirically denied."

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"Donnelly’s vague references to magic implants in the viewer a metaphysical connection between the objective connections she denies explanation for. When the tangible associations between materials are denied, the viewer fills in the gaps with metaphysical, almost superstitious association."

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"Donnelly acts similarly to the sociopathic character in J.G Ballard’s ‘The Overloaded Man’, who pathologically develops the ability to make associations and forms from everything that surrounds him while disregarding their social significance altogether. Not seeing objects with functionality or semiotic content, the protagonist is driven to see material in a phenomenological way, until in the end he can only see the soft, spongy materiality of his wife, driving him to sculpt her into whatever form he sees more appropriate (and thus murdering her in the process)."

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"The creative process might be as if she began with object and subsequently erased every known feature of that object, and then, when material objectivity naturally then recedes into pure thought, she does the same in that domain, and then repeats the process. Taking way from the world speaks to the imperfections of the known world and is an attempt to ‘de-reify’, one might say."

"Donnelly’s praxis of odd materials and incomplete concepts seem to be the inverse form of the understood world, the negative space of what already exists."

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"No thing has a cohesive identity, and everything is abstracted. Even abstraction, as a category, is negated. Negating all traces of identity prompts that the world is not acceptable as it is, but also that the proper tools to build society in man’s image have been misgiven, taken away, or jeopardized. Even shapes don’t exist, but are non-shapes, which of course paradoxically precludes that there are shapes implied. Inability to identify is not only the creation of work, but also reflects the truncation of reflective experience viewers feel today — if Donnelly were in fact making shapes, they would nevertheless be ambiguated by the poverty of viewing in the fastidious experience of aesthetic reflection today."

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Thursday, May 13, 2010

found: eerie old illustrations

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found: Jack Winn, Phyllida Barlow, Andreas Paul Weber

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Tuesday, May 11, 2010

found: Andro Wekua, Hans Bellmer, Kirstine Roepstorff

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Rodney LaTourelle on Andro Wekua:

"In the work of Andro Wekua, it is not space and distance that is framed but an unfathomable inwardness. His single sculpture at the Schinkel Pavillion deftly anchors the space with an uncanny sense of psychological tension. A life-size wax figurine leans back within its partially glassed in enclosure in a pose so carefully dramatic that it could only conjure up an extreme condition such as death or delight. The elegant (Dan Graham-like) rectilinear frame concentrates a melancholic aura around the rigid form, whose simultaneously theatrical and withdrawn presence is further emphasized by the circular gallery space." (source)

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