Thursday, August 27, 2009

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Casting spells in order to find some sleep tonight; remember Bruno Schulz writing about a bedroom turning into a forest wherein the iconic Bianca character escaped a desperate and useless obsession?
found: Christian Weber, Aquirax Uno, William Blake

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Wednesday, August 26, 2009

found: an interview with Allison Shulnik here.

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Tuesday, August 25, 2009

found: Claudia Wieser, Hadley Holliday, Heinz Hajek-Halke

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Monday, August 24, 2009

found: Richard Barnes, and two unknown

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it-narratives Part II

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From 'Thing Theory' by Bill Brown:

"occasions outside the scene of phenomenological attention that nonetheless teach you that you're "caught up in things" and that the "body is a thing among things."

“We begin to confront the thingness of objects when they stop working for us: when the drill breaks down”.

"You could imagine things, second, as what is excessive in objects, as what exceeds their mere materialization as objects or their mere utilization as objects - their force as a sensuous presence or as a metaphysical presence, the magic by which objects become values, fetishes, idols, and totems. Temporalized as the before and after of the object, thingness amounts to a latency (the not yet formed or the not yet formable) and to an excess (what remains physically or metaphysically irreducible to objects). But this temporality obscures the all-at-onceness, the simultaneity, of the object/thing dialectic and the fact that, all at once, the thing seems to name the object just as it is even as it names some thing else."

"what's encountered as opposed to what's thought"

"In Lacan, the Thing is and it isn't. It exists, but in no phenomenal form."

"Methodological fetishism, then, is not an error so much as it is a condition for thought, new thoughts about how inanimate objects constitute human subjects, how they move them, how they threaten them, how they facilitate or threaten their relation to other subjects."

From 'The Knowing Book: Authors, It-Narratives, and Objectification in the Eighteenth Century' by Christina Lupton:

"sublime and transcendental modes of selfconsciousness"

"This wish, playfully enacted in later it-narratives, repudiates what Susan Stewart describes as the longing for the containment of the book as a miniature world: "[t]he book sits before me, closed and unread; it is an object, a set of surfaces."

"But opened, it seems revealed; its physical aspects give way to abstraction and a nexus of new temporalitites".

"materiality provides the environment that allows these fictions to achieve their own status as thinking things; to sidestep the opposition between subject and object, or between literature and trash, by asserting more matter-of factly their own objectification."

Thursday, August 20, 2009

it-narratives part I

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From Bill Brown's review of "The Secret Life of Things: Animals, Objects, and It-Narratives in Eighteenth-Century England":

"This is the subgenre now widely designated as the “it-narrative,” with protagonists—shoes, quills, coats, cats, dogs, cork-screws, coaches, kites, canes, pins, and any number of coins, most famously the gold guinea Chrysal—that often serve as homodiegetic narrators. As Mark Blackwell explains in the introduction to this impressive collection of essays, despite Joseph Addison’s “Adventures of a Shilling” (1710) and Tobias Smollett’s The History and Adventures of an Atom (1769) belonging to this genre, scholars have widely ignored it, disdaining it as formula fiction, and it has thus “languished in critical purgatory” (11). The Secret Life of Things provides instead a critical paradise. For some readers, this collection could no doubt be captioned “everything you wanted to know about it-narratives and chose not to ask”;for many more readers, though, it will certainly serve as the critical foundation for formulating new questions about a form of narrative prose fiction that proves to be far more than a curiosity, newly legible here as an integral part of literary and cultural history, appearing to allegorize (and at times to ameliorate) anxieties about authorship, property, ethnicity, female sexuality, point of view, and the eighteenth century’s burgeoning consumer culture. Marxian
materialism indifferent to the particularities of the material object world."

"The “demonic power” of objects in Moll Flanders, which the protagonist cannot resist, becomes literalized in Henry Durbin’s A Narrative of Some Extraordinary Things (1800), where curtains and clothes, carpets and chamber-pots, suddenly come to life."

"the it-narrative as a “cautionary tale”"

From Lori Merish's review of Bill Brown's 'A Sense of Things: The Object Matter of American Literature':

"these essays salvage "things" as critical objects (and objects of criticism) from a poststructuralist epistemology that insists on dispensing with them, distinguishing autonomous "things" from discursively constituted "objects." And now he has devoted an entire study to exploring how things work their magic on and in late nineteenth-century literature, and how the story of the realist, naturalist and regionalist fascination with things helps illuminate the objectivist modernist aesthetic most closely associated with William Carlos Williams ("Say it, no ideas but in things"). The result is a brilliant work of criticism."

"Intelligent and thought-provoking throughout, written with uncommon precision and elegance, The Sense of Things is an immensely interesting, intensely rewarding book, one that contains rich insights on most every page. The book thus amplifies the insights of literary phenomenologists such as Poulet on the nature of literary "experience" and ways in which textual worlds are made to seem real."

"prosopopeia"

From 'Can the Sofa Speak? A Look at Thing Theory' by John Plotz:

"Heidegger's chewy phenomenological account of the "thingness of things""

""Thing" is far better than any other word at summing up impoderable, slightly creepy what-is-it-ness...Thing theory is at its best, therefore, when it focuses on this sense of failure, or partial failure, to name or to classify. Thing theory highlights, or ought to highlight, approaches to the margins - of language, of cognition, of material substance...these are limit cases at which our ordinary categories for classifying signs and substances, meaning and materiality, appear to break down."

"what might be called an eco-critical or simply anti-Enlightenment alternative to such a culturalist object theory, an objection based on the thing's capacity to speak for itself."

"where the weakness of the guarantees of Truth show through and hence sites where people are forced to redescribe what it is they are looking for in an art "object.""

"To Peter Galliston, the question for Rorschach blots is about how modernists understood the psyche, or the idea of a "deep" human subject. And for Geoffrey Batchen, who is more overtly deconstructive, the point is to trace the Victorian exploration of how a photograph might be both a representation of its subject and in some sense a literal extension of that subject - a "nature-made" image that thus has the same Nature as that which it depicts."

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

found: Kaye Donachie, Inka Jarvinen, Andy Goldsworthy

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found: Anja Schaffner

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Monday, August 17, 2009

found: Moki

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Sunday, August 16, 2009

found: various illustrations from this source.



Saturday, August 15, 2009

found: Rachel Goodyear

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found: Geraldine Chaplin, Julian Schnabel, Maggie Brown

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Friday, August 14, 2009

found: Ryan McGinley

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found: Saiman Chow, and two spooky faces in windows

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Thursday, August 13, 2009

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Its been years since I searched for Mervyn Peake drawings, and it seems there are more books out there with collections of these drawings than I thought I knew - wow! The Tiger woman - Sci-Fi Gustav Dore!
found: Danny Treacy

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found: two unknown, and Cao Fei

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Wednesday, August 12, 2009

sexy 1970s Malcolm McDowell

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Much more on dear Malcolm very soon indeed!

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

found: Blaise Larmee

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Monday, August 10, 2009

found: Juan Munoz, unknown, 'Whatever Happened To Helen?'

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Friday, August 07, 2009

found: unknown beauties

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